web analytics

Blog

Our blog features constant updates on a variety of subjects relating to education, conservation, exhibits, special events, and much more. You can expect to read about art, birds and birding, weather, dragonflies and damselflies, reptiles and amphibians, literature and media, fascinating stories, plants and trees, butterflies and moths, climate change, agriculture, and of course, Roger Tory Peterson.

Birds; Eloquent Expressions of Life

Posted by on Oct 17, 2017 in Blog | Comments Off on Birds; Eloquent Expressions of Life

Birds; Eloquent Expressions of Life

Roger Tory Peterson once said; “Birds are eloquent expressions of life and vitality, and watching them makes you a bit more alive….” Judging by his remarkable artistic renditions of a multitude of avian species, artist Neil Rizos would wholeheartedly agree with this statement. The Canada Goose shown here – created with mixed media – is one of many beautiful pieces in RTPI’s current exhibition, “Neil Rizos; the Art of Exploration”. Don’t miss your chance to view this outstanding show while it’s here this fall. For...

read more

Baby Snapping Turtle

Posted by on Oct 16, 2017 in Blog | Comments Off on Baby Snapping Turtle

Baby Snapping Turtle

It’s ‘Meet Your Neighbours’ Monday! Here we have a baby Snapping Turtle (Chelydra serpentina) – photographed by RTPI president Twan Leenders in Jamestown, NY. Most folks are at least somewhat familiar with these short-tempered freshwater turtles, but have you ever seen one so...

read more

Solar Chautauqua

Posted by on Oct 14, 2017 in Blog | Comments Off on Solar Chautauqua

Solar Chautauqua

Are you interested in doing good for the environment while saving money on your energy bill? RTPI is working with the Chautauqua County Department of Planning and Economic Development and other community partners to get the word out about the Solar Chautauqua Initiative! Visit www.solarchautauqua.org for...

read more

Baltimore Oriole

Posted by on Oct 14, 2017 in Blog | Comments Off on Baltimore Oriole

Baltimore Oriole

They may be gone from our yards for the winter but I thought that as we near Halloween it was very appropriate to post this male Baltimore Oriole (Icterus galbula). I enjoyed watching it feeding in an oak tree this past spring on a cool, cloudy and windy day. Do you ever have any luck getting them to come down to eye level at your feeders? I certainly do not, and this bird hopping down to the lower branches of the tree for a minute was a real treat. I hear them every day all summer long but rarely get the chance to see a glow like this one up...

read more

The Art of Exploration

Posted by on Oct 12, 2017 in Blog | Comments Off on The Art of Exploration

The Art of Exploration

RTPI’s current exhibition, Neil Rizos: the Art of Exploration, showcases Rizos’ artistic talent and reflects his keen perception of the living world through a myriad of media including bronze sculptures, paintings, drawings, pastels, etchings, lithographs and woodcuts. “Pintails”, shown here, is just one of over 70 different pieces depicting various species of birds. Be sure to visit RTPI this fall to view this outstanding...

read more

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Citizen Scientist Training November 1st

Posted by on Oct 6, 2017 in Blog | Comments Off on Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Citizen Scientist Training November 1st

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Citizen Scientist Training November 1st

Although autumn is just beginning here in Western New York, the winter season will soon be upon us. The colder months, November through March to be exact, is the perfect time of year to search the area’s forests for an invasive forest pest known as Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (HWA). HWA is an aphid-like insect, originating from Asia, which feeds off of the food storage cells below the needles of an Eastern Hemlock tree and hides itself under white woolly masses for protection. Within only a matter of 4-10 years an individual tree can succumb to an...

read more

Bonding while Bird-Banding

Posted by on Oct 5, 2017 in Blog | Comments Off on Bonding while Bird-Banding

Bonding while Bird-Banding

Artist Neil Rizos, shown here with RTPI President Twan Leenders, enjoyed participating in bird banding efforts at RTPI during his stay in Jamestown. Although Neil is no longer in our area, his art is still here! RTPI’s current exhibition, ‘Neil Rizos: the Art of Exploration’, showcases Rizos’ artistic talent and reflects his keen perception of the living world through a myriad of media. Have you been in to experience his amazing work...

read more

Drake Northern Shoveler

Posted by on Oct 4, 2017 in Blog | Comments Off on Drake Northern Shoveler

Drake Northern Shoveler

I finally had the chance to properly photograph a beautiful drake Northern Shoveler (Anas clypeata) late last winter. This bird was on the way north for the breeding season, stopping off at a warm spot along a river marsh. I post him now because earlier this week a colleague of mine saw a small flock of Northern Shovelers flying by on the way south already! It is hard to believe we are that deep into the season, but the winter waterfowl are on the way. What is your favorite species of duck? Any you can’t wait to add to your life list?...

read more

Artist Neil Rizos at RTPI

Posted by on Oct 3, 2017 in Blog | Comments Off on Artist Neil Rizos at RTPI

Artist Neil Rizos at RTPI

Neil Rizos was in the Jamestown area for most of the week following the opening of his exhibit, and he spent much of this time at RTPI interacting with visitors, students, and staff. Rizos’ exhibition and the associated programming were made possible through a generous sponsorship from Key Bank. While the artist himself is no longer in our area, Rizos’ spectacular work will remain on view in the RTPI galleries through mid-December. Many of these pieces are available for purchase, and the variety of media represented make for a diverse...

read more

October Orbweavers

Posted by on Oct 2, 2017 in Blog | Comments Off on October Orbweavers

October Orbweavers

It’s ‘Meet Your Neighbours Monday’! With the arrival of autumn, you are likely to notice a distinctive suite of spiders around your home. The species shown here is the Marbled Orb Weaver (Araneus marmoreus). The appearance of spiders like this one during the month of October has earned their group the nickname “Halloween spider”. Orb Weavers come in several different colors and patterns, so you might say that they wear a variety of costumes! Marbled orbweaver (Araneus marmoreus) photographed by Twan Leenders....

read more