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Posts Tagged "migration"

Treasures of the Tropics

Posted by on Feb 17, 2017

Treasures of the Tropics

In less than two weeks an RTPI crew will be headed to Costa Rica again, this time with students from the Forman School. Students will participate in a variety of research projects, including migratory bird banding and monitoring endangered and recovering amphibian populations, such as this Rufous-eyed Brook Tree Frog (Duellmanohyla rufioculis). Stay tuned for more information...

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Banded Peregrine Falcon

Posted by on Dec 2, 2016

Banded Peregrine Falcon

Here is a recent flashback story for everyone on this lovely Friday. October is always a terrific month to find all sorts of raptors making their way south for a prolonged migration or dispersing from their nesting area to find acceptable wintering grounds. Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus) continue to rebound from their demise due to pesticides in our region in the last century, taking up breeding sites on skyscrapers in major cities, under bridges on interstates, and even nest box platforms at locations like Dunkirk’s power plant on Lake Erie in our own Chautauqua County. Some of...

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American Tree Sparrow

Posted by on Nov 16, 2016

American Tree Sparrow

This American Tree Sparrow (Spizelloides arborea) still seems to be looking for a tree, but we are happy to welcome them back to anywhere they like here in our backyards....

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Palm Warbler

Posted by on Nov 14, 2016

Palm Warbler

This pretty little Palm Warbler (Setophaga palmarum) is one of many that passed through our region in the last couple of months, with most now further south than RTPI. Nevertheless, keep an eye out for this glowing yellow birds as we head into December if you want to brighten up your birding day. The habitual tail pumping is sure to help give it...

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Diverse Song Sparrows

Posted by on Nov 10, 2016

Diverse Song Sparrows

The Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) is such a diverse species despite the fact it seems so plain, brown, simple or even “dull”. Fall migration lets us see so many different subspecies and forms – perhaps up to a couple dozen of the former and several dozen of the latter. Basically, many of the birds end up looking distinct from one another in very subtle ways, and I wish every year that I could better understand their biology. Scott Kruitbosch Conservation & Outreach...

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