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Posts Tagged "tree"

Yellow-rumped Warblers Feeding

Posted by on Oct 31, 2017

Yellow-rumped Warblers Feeding

I always feel that as we enter November we shift from one phase of avian life to the next. Songbird migrants are now decreasing rapidly in both abundance and diversity. More waterfowl are beginning to arrive on our shores. Our wintering species start to show up frequently at our feeders. Birds also shift from eating insects to dining on this season’s harvest, as is the case with the Yellow-rumped Warblers (Setophaga coronata) here. Junipers, cedars, holly trees and many more all provide delicious berries that were the treats for these Halloween birds. I did not even notice I had...

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Spooky Sounds

Posted by on Oct 30, 2017

Spooky Sounds

Are you following us on Facebook? If not be sure to check out our page and have a listen to a Barred Owl heard this...

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Finally Fall Foliage

Posted by on Oct 26, 2017

Finally Fall Foliage

It feels like it took the fall foliage a while, but now we have plenty to soak in and...

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Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Citizen Scientist Training November 1st

Posted by on Oct 6, 2017

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Citizen Scientist Training November 1st

Although autumn is just beginning here in Western New York, the winter season will soon be upon us. The colder months, November through March to be exact, is the perfect time of year to search the area’s forests for an invasive forest pest known as Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (HWA). HWA is an aphid-like insect, originating from Asia, which feeds off of the food storage cells below the needles of an Eastern Hemlock tree and hides itself under white woolly masses for protection. Within only a matter of 4-10 years an individual tree can succumb to an HWA infestation if left unnoticed. This deadly...

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RTP in Another Place in Another Time

Posted by on Mar 16, 2017

RTP in Another Place in Another Time

Although his work required extensive travel, it seemed that Roger Tory Peterson needed the world as much as it needed him. His wife, Barbara, wrote to her mother that no matter where Roger was, he always wanted to be somewhere else. He made seven safari trips to Africa during his lifetime, shooting footage for his documentary “Wild Africa”, which contains more rare and exotic birds than any film of its time. His conservation message is powerful, and it pervades the film: “A bird like the whooping crane is more divine than the most inspired work of art. Why? Because it is creation itself;...

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