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Posts Tagged "(Anthracothorax prevostii)"

Green-breasted Mangos

Posted on Jan 26, 2017

Green-breasted Mangos

Since everyone loves these tails here is another shot of both male and female Green-breasted Mango (Anthracothorax prevostii) hummingbirds all lined up by RTPI Affiliate Sean Graesser. He will definitely be doing more of this photography during his next tropical research trip.

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Green-breasted Mango (Anthracothorax prevostii) Female Feathers

Posted on Jan 17, 2017

Green-breasted Mango (Anthracothorax prevostii) Female Feathers

We showed you RTPI Affiliate Sean Graesser’s look at the feathers of a male Green-breasted Mango (Anthracothorax prevostii) hummingbird, and now here is the female. Exquisite! Much more to come from Costa Rica…

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Green-breasted Mango Feathers

Posted on Jan 12, 2017

Green-breasted Mango Feathers

RTPI Affiliate Sean Graesser decided to take a closer look at the feathers of the hummingbirds he has been banding in Costa Rica. Here’s the dorsal and ventral view of the male Green-breasted Mango (Anthracothorax prevostii).

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RTPI’s National Invasive Species Awareness Week

Posted on Feb 12, 2016

RTPI’s National Invasive Species Awareness Week

National Invasive Species Awareness Week – February 21-27, 2016 RTPI, in partnership with WNY PRISM, will be offering multiple events to the public during week. If you wish to register for one or both of the workshops please fill out this form. Please register by mail or email no later than Saturday February 20th. Registration forms and checks payable to the Roger Tory Peterson Institute can be sent to 311 Curtis Street, Jamestown NY 14701. Forms may also be emailed to Elyse Henshaw [email protected] and payment can be made the morning of the workshop. Monday February 22 at 6pm Ken Parker...

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Green-breasted Mango

Posted on Dec 24, 2015

Green-breasted Mango

The Green-breasted Mango (Anthracothorax prevostii) is the most common resident hummingbird species Sean encounters at Finca Pura Vida in Costa Rica. It’s an especially interesting resident because it has a slower molt than most hummingbirds, leading to a mosaic of patterns of juvenile individuals. They often appear to be stuck in between certain plumage ages. This bird is the adult male with gorgeous rich purple and blue gorget on display. Photographed by RTPI Affiliate Sean Graesser for the Meet Your Neighbours global biodiversity project in Costa Rica while on assignment for the...

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